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  • Glossary
  • Templates
  • Paper Choices
  • Envelope Sizes
  • Folding Samples
  • Tech Tips
  • QR Codes
Glossary of Terms

A B C D E F G H I J L M O P R S T U V W

A

A-Line or A-Style Envelope ~ An envelope with a square flap; often used for announcements, invitations, and note cards. Accordion Fold ~ A bindery term describing a type of fold that involves two or more parallel folds in opposite direction to the previous fold that creates a pleated or accordion affect. Against the Grain ~ A term to describe printing at right angles to the direction of the paper grain.

B

Baronial Envelope ~ An envelope with a a large pointed flap; often used for announcements, invitations, and note cards. Bleed ~ When ink appears to "run off" the edge of the paper; the effect is achieved by overprinting an area and then trimming it down to size. Booklet Envelope ~ An envelope with the seal flap on the long side of the envelope. Business Reply Envelope (BRE) ~ An envelope with a pre-printed postage permit and return address. (In contrast, a Business Return envelope has a pre-printed return address and the sender applies the postage.)

C

Catalog Envelope ~ An envelope with the seal flap on the short side of the envelope.

CMYK ~ The acronym for “cyan, magenta, yellow, black,” the four basic colors of ink.

Coated Paper ~ Paper that has a dull or glossy coating, generally giving it a smoother finish and more opacity. A coated stock allows ink colors and images to “pop” or “jump” off the sheet more, since the ink rests on the surface of the paper rather than soaking into it. Coated paper can take longer to dry after printing.

Commercial Envelope ~ An envelope with a pointed flap that is commonly used for business correspondence, such as letterhead, statements, etc..

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D

Densitometer ~ A device used by printers for quality control to measure the density of ink color.

Die Cutting ~ The process of cutting a shape or design in paper (or other material) using a sharp die or block.

DPI ~ An acronym for "Dots Per Inch," which is a measurement used to express the quality of the resolution of an image.

Dull Finish ~ A term used to describe paper that has a smooth, low gloss.

Dummy ~ A rough mock-up or comp showing the position and finish size of a soon-to-be-printed piece. Back to top


E

ECF (Elemental Chlorine Free) ~ Describes a paper made of virgin or recycled fiber that is bleached with chlorine dioxide or other chlorine compounds, which is a cleaner process than traditional chlorine gas bleaching. (See PCF and TCF.)

Embossing ~ A special paper finishing method that uses a die to achieve a raised or 3D effect on paper. Often used with foil stamping.

F

Finish ~ The quality of the paper surface (e.g., dull, laid, matte, satin).

Foil Stamping ~ A special process using a die to apply a thin metallic or pigmented film to paper. Often used with embossing
Folio ~ The area where the page number appears.

Four-Color Process ~ The process of combining the four basic colors of ink (yellow, magenta, cyan, and black) to achieve a full-color effect. (See CMYK.) Back to top

G

Gang ~ Printing more than one job on the same press sheet.

Grain ~ The direction of fibers in a sheet of paper. Grain is important to keep in mind if a printed project is going to be folded; going with the grain makes for a stronger, cleaner fold and helps to prevent the ink from cracking.


Gripper Edge ~ The amount of space required on a press sheet to allow the metal fingers on a press to grab and hold the sheet as it passes through the press.


H

Hickey ~ An unintentional spot or mark that appears on a printed piece due to dust particles, lint, dried ink, etc., on a printing plate or blanket. Back to top

I

IBC ~ The acronym for inside back cover.

IFC ~ The acronym for inside front cover.


Indicia ~ Postal information that is preprinted on mailing pieces in place of a postage stamp.

J

Jog ~ The process of vibrating a stack of printed sheets to align them tightly before trimming to the final size.

L

Laminating ~ The process of applying a thin transparent plastic coating to the printed sheet to provide protection and a glossy finish. Back to top

M

Matte Finish ~ A term used to describe a coated paper that has a dull finish versus a high-gloss finish.

Moire ~ An undesirable pattern created by incorrect angles of overprinting halftone screens. Back to top

O

Orphan ~ A term that describes when only a part of the last word of a sentence is alone on the last line of text.

Overrun or overs ~ A surplus of copies printed in excess of the requested amount. It is common practice in the printing industry to have either a 10 percent overrun or underrun.

P

Pantone Matching System (PMS) ~ A registered name that is known worldwide as the standard language for for identifying specific ink colors for designers, manufacturers, customers, et al.

PCF (Process Chlorine Free) ~ Describes a paper made of fiber that is recycled and unbleached, or bleached without the use of additional chlorine or chlorine derivatives. (Since the paper is recycled, it may have been previously bleached with chlorine or chlorine derivatives, so it is not totally chlorine free.) (See ECF and TCF.) Perfect binding ~ An adhesive binding that glues the pages to the cover, as in a book.

Perfecting ~ The process of printing on both sides of the press sheet on the same pass through the press. Perforating ~ A method of drilling or punching a series of small holes in a line on paper to create easy-to-remove response cards, coupons, etc.

PMS ~ See Pantone Matching System above.
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R

Ream ~ Equivalent to 500 sheets of paper. Remittance Envelope ~ An envelope with a seal flap covering most of the back of the envelope, and used for collecting donations, etc. Resolution ~ A measurement expressed in dots per inch (DPI) used to define the quality of an image or output.

RGB ~ The acronym for "red, green, and blue," the three primary colors used for computer monitor displays. They tend to be "rosier" or "more fruity" than CMYK appears, and must be converted to CMYK for printing.
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S

Saddle Stitch ~ A bindery method using staples in the seam or fold to stitch multiple pages together.

Score ~ A method used to put a crease in paper to facilitate folding.


Self Cover ~ A cover that uses the same paper stock as the inside pages of a booklet.


Set Off ~ The unintentional transfer of ink from one printed sheet to the back of another, which can be caused by not allowing enough drying time before handling the printed sheets.


Sheet Fed Press ~ A type of press that prints from single sheets of paper rather than from reels or rolls of paper.

Stet ~ A proofreading term used to indicate that a correction should be ignored or canceled; in other words, let it stand as is.
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T

TCF (Totally Chlorine Free) ~ Describes a paper made of virgin fiber that is unbleached or is bleached without chlorine or chlorine derivatives. (See ECF and PCF.) Thermography ~ A method of printing that produces a raised ink surface. Trim Marks ~ The marks on a press sheet showing the cut lines for trimming down to the final size.

U

Up ~ A term indicating how many items are set up on the same press sheet, such as two up, four up, etc. Back to top

V

Varnish ~ An extra, transparent coating applied to all or part of a printed sheet to achieve a glossy finish and/or to seal heavy ink coverage.

W

Washup ~ The process of cleaning or washing ink off the rollers and blankets of the press. Web Press ~ A type of press that prints from reels or rolls of paper versus sheet-fed paper. Widow ~ A term that describes when a single word at the end of a sentence is alone on the last line of text. Window Envelope ~ An envelope with an opening (with or without a translucent patch) that allow the contents inside the envelope to show through, such as a mailing address. Wiro binding ~ A type of binding that requires pages to be punched with an aligned pattern of holes so that a double loop wire can fit into them; this type of binding allows a book to lay flat when open.

WYSIWYG ~ What You See Is What You Get.
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Templates

A tricky part about designing a trifold brochure is correctly sizing the six panels (three on the outside of the trifold, and three on the inside). The panels cannot be the same width if they are to nest inside each other properly and fold evenly. Correct panel sizing is even more important if the fold line is designed to follow along the edge of a graphic element (e.g., a photo or block of color).

Normally, the end panel that folds in would be 1/32-inch to 1/8-inch narrower than the other two panels. See specific dimensions in our illustration below.

As a handy and convenient tool for your next trifold design project, we have set up a correctly sized trifold template that you can download. The template is available in three software formats (InDesign CS4, InDesign CS5, and Quark 8). (As a bonus, we have also included templates for a 4-panel barrel fold.)

Please click on the appropriate link to download the zipped file. If you have any questions, do not hesitate to email or call us (802-254-3550).

Trifold Templates
InDesign CS5 or higher Download
InDesign CS4 Download
Quark 8 Download
   
Barrel Fold Templates
InDesign CS5 or higher Download
InDesign CS4 Download
Quark 8 Download


trifold
click on image for higher resolution
Paper Choices

Over the years, our clients have presented various scenarios to us describing the job they would like to print, asking us to recommend some paper options — for instance, a nice paper that may be a little more costly or an adequate paper that would be a little more cost-effective. Also, many clients are looking for "greener" alternatives and want to know more recycled content and FSC certification.

Based on our experience, we have outlined below some paper options that may help in your decision-making process. You will see that we have organized the information under the categories of Uncoated, Coated, and Miscellaneous .

For further reference, we have outlined popular weights of stock.

HOWEVER, we have to add a caveat . . . the paper industry has changed drastically in recent years due to mergers, market trends, global suppliers, international tariffs, and the like. The availability of items in a product line or sometimes the entire product line varies day to day. So this outline is intended to be a guide and starting point for discussion.

We are happy to work closely with you to investigate and select a paper that will optimize the quality of your final product while still meeting your budget and other requirements. Please contact us to discuss availability and options.

Uncoated Stock
Stock
Recycled FSC Notes
Cougar 10% Yes Good for newsletters; inexpensive.
Environment 30% Yes Cover, Writing & Text weights available; Mesa White, Tortilla, Ultra Bright White, White
Environment 100% Yes Cover, Writing & Text weights available; PC 100 Natural, PC 100 White, 100% Green Energy
Finch Accent Opaque No No 96 Bright; Nice, bright whites, creams; a basic paper.
Finch Fine 30%
PCW
Yes 96 Bright; Basic whites and creams; VHF finish.
Mohawk Brite Hue Selection of
Colors
30%
No Variety of colors; 20# text, 60# text, or 65# cover only; often requires full cartons.
Mohawk Opaque Some Some May require even (full) cartons. Envelopes available.
Mohawk Options 100% Yes White, Cool White, Cream White.
Mohawk Via 30% No Smooth finish; everything but Pure White available; popular choice
Mohawk Via 100% No PC 100 Cool White; popular choice
Neenah Classic Crest 30% No Smooth finish; Earthstone, Pebblestone, Peppercorn, Sage Green, Saw Green, Tarragon.
Neenah Classic Crest 100% No Recycled Bright White, Recycled Natural White
Neenah Classic Laid 30% No Textured; less expensive than linen. Recycled Bright White, Recycled Natural White.
Neenah Classic Laid 100% No Textured; less expensive than linen. Recycled Bright White, Recycled Natural White.
Neenah Classic Linen 30% No Textured, more woven, more expensive than laid. Smooth finish; Earthstone, Pebblestone, Peppercorn, Sage Green, Saw Green, Tarragon.
Neenah Classic Linen 100% No Textured, more woven, more expensive than laid. Recycled Bright White, Recycled Natural White
Neenah Classic Environment 30% Yes May require even (full) cartons
Neenah Classic Environment 100% Yes May require even (full) cartons
New Leaf 100% Yes Mill direct, even (full) cartons only, shipping fees; stock include Reincarnation, Primavera, Sakura 100, Everest. Imagination and Opaque.
Paperfect Opaque No Yes 96 Bright; good value; popular; acid free; archival.
Rolland Enviro 100 No Yes 88 Bright; good for forms; inexpensive.
Rolland Opaque 30%
PCW
Yes Nice option for rack cards, postcards, newsletters, brochures, inserts.
Springhill Colors 30% No Variety of colors: bond, offset and covers available; everyday paper; inexpensive.
Strathmore Writing 30% No Bright White, Soft Gray, Soft Blue
Strathmore Script 30% No Bright White, Soft Gray, Soft Blue


Coated Stock
Stock
Recycled FSC Notes
Carolina No No Use for Coated One Side (C1S); good for postcards; less expensive than Kromekote.
Cornwall Coated One Side or Coated Two Sides (C1S or C2S) No Yes 92 Bright; Achieve caliber without weight.
Galerie Art 30% Yes Nice glossy choice for newsletters, mailers, notecards.
Kromekote 30%
PCW
No Use for coated one side (C1S); good for postcards.
Opus 10% No 92 Bright
Sappi Lustro Some No 91 Bright; good value; popular; gloss and dull coating available.
Titan No No 91 Bright; good value, popular; readily available; gloss and dull coating available; text and cover weight.

Miscellaneous Stock
Miscellaneous Label Stock
Recycled FSC Notes
MacTac Starliner Self-Adhesive Labels 30% PCW Acid free; pressure sensitive; permanent; vellum finish; 70# white; 89 bright; sheets instead of roll.
NCR (carbonless) Forms Recover line is 30% PCW Yes Recyclable; popular choice for invoices, receipts, delivery slips, etc.
Popular Envelope Styles and Sizes

To help you in understanding and choosing envelopes, we have provided several illustrations at the bottom of this page showing popular envelope styles and sizes, with enclosure sizes indicated.

Additional standard sizes for common envelopes are listed below.

Also below, you will find a short "Envelope Glossary."

Standard Envelope Sizes

Standard Sizes for Commercial Envelopes
#6-3/4 (3.625 x 6.5)
#7 (3.75 x 6.75)
#7-3/4 (3.875 x 7.5)
Monarch (3.875 x 7.5)
# 8-5/8 (3.625 x 8.625) 
#9 (3.875 x 8.875)
#10 (4.125 x 9.5)
#11 (4.5 x 10.375)
#12 (4.75 x 11)
#14 (5 x 11.5)

Standard Sizes for A-Line Envelopes
A2 (4.375 x 5.75)
A6 (4.75 x 6.5)
A7 (5.25 x 7.25)
A8 (5.5 x 8.125)
A10 (6 x 9.5)

Standard Sizes for Baronial Envelopes
4 Bar (3.625 x 5.125)
Gladstone (3.625 x 5.625)
5 Bar (4.125 x 5.625)
5.5 Bar (4.375 x 5.75)
6 Bar (4.75 x 6.5)
Lee (5.25 x 7.25)

Standard Sizes for Remittance Envelopes
No. 6-1/4 (3.5 x 6)
No. 6-1/2 (3.5 x 6.25)
No. 6-3/4 (3.625 x 6.5)
No. 9 (3.875 x 8.875)

Standard Sizes for Catalog Envelopes
6 x 9
6.5 x 9.5
7 x 10
7.5 x 10.5
8.75 x 11.25
9 x 12
9.5 x 12.625
10 x 13
11.5 x 14.5
10 x 15
12 x 15.5
 
Standard Sizes for Booklet Envelopes
4.75 x 6.5
5.5 x 7.5
5.5 x 8.125
5.75 x 8.875
6 x 9
6 x 9.5
6.5 x 9.5
7 x 10
7.5 x 10.5
8.75 x 11.5
9 x 12
9.5 x 12.625
10 x 13

 

Envelope Glossary

A-Line or A-Style Envelope ~ An envelope with a square flap; often used for announcements, invitations, and note cards.

Baronial Envelope ~ An envelope with a a large pointed flap; often used for announcements, invitations, and note cards.

Booklet Envelope ~ An envelope with the seal flap on the long side of the envelope.

Business Reply Envelope (BRE) ~ An envelope with a pre-printed postage permit and return address. (In contrast, a Business Return envelope has a pre-printed return address and the sender applies the postage.)

Catalog Envelope ~ An envelope with the seal flap on the short side of the envelope.

Commercial Envelope ~ An envelope with a pointed flap that is commonly used for business correspondence, such as letterhead, statements, etc..

Remittance Envelope ~ An envelope with a seal flap covering most of the back of the envelope, and used for collecting donations, etc.

Window Envelope ~ An envelope with an opening (with or without a translucent patch) that allow the contents inside the envelope to show through, such as a mailing address.

 

Popular Envelope Styles and Sizes

To help you in understanding and choosing envelopes, we have provided several illustrations below of popular envelope styles and sizes, with enclosure sizes indicated.
envelopes

Folding Samples
To help you in deciding and describing what type of fold your project needs, here are several illustrations of popular options. Please ask us if you do not see what you are looking for.

Barrel Fold Barrel Fold Double Parallel Fold Double Parallel Fold
Eight Page Right Angle Fold Eight Page
Right Angle
Fold
Half Fold Half Fold
Half and Letter Fold Half and Letter Fold Gate Fold Gate Fold
Letter fold

Letter Fold
(Fold in thirds)

Z fold Z - Fold


Tech Tips

To help you with preparing files, formatting images, creating PDF’s, and otherwise enhancing your process or product, we have collected the following useful tech tips. You may want to check back on occasion to see if we’ve added anything new to this page. If you do not see your question addressed below, please let us know. At Howard Printing, we are always happy to discuss your thoughts or questions in person or on the phone, and encourage you to bring in your ideas early.

Design

Bleeds — If you are planning for your project to print all the way to the edge of the sheet of paper (i.e. “bleed” off the edge of the paper), you need to extend your artwork 1/8-inch beyond where the sheet will be trimmed on press. Click on Glossary Tab Above.

Envelope design — If you are designing a remittance envelope, be sure to pay attention to the glue area since any text or image printed or written there would be ruined upon opening. Click on Envelope Sizes Tab Above.

Fonts — When packaging or collecting for output, be sure to place a checkmark in the boxes for “Printer Fonts” and “Screen Fonts” for Quark or the boxes for “Copy Fonts” and “Include Fonts and Links” for InDesign.

Image formats — The best image formats are JPG, TIF, EPS, and PSD. Take notice of your fonts for EPS and PSD images, because they have layers linked to fonts. TIF images can sometimes have layers, too. For JPG images, keep the Photoshop quality at 6 or higher. Web image formats (GIF, PNG) do not produce good print quality.

Image resolution — Save your images at 300 dpi or higher for photographs and 600 dpi or higher for line art. Web images are usually 72 dpi which is too low for good print quality.

Postal regulations — For direct mail pieces, it is wise to show your artwork to a Mailpiece Design Analyst at your local U.S. Post Office before printing to ensure it meets current postal regulations, for size, weight, address panel, folds, etc. (See mailing and shipping links.)

Proofing

Corrections or changes to your original document — If we have already been working with your file, it is usually best for us to make any changes or corrections you might have, rather than you submitting a whole new original file. (We do not add on charges for minor AA’s.)

Folding dummies — Before submitting your job for press, be sure to print out a laser and make a folding dummy to ensure text, photos, and other graphic elements fall the way you want them to across folds, and to check that your panels are centered. Click on Folding Samples Tab Above


Preparing for Press

Color — When printing four-color process, any RGB color used in your artwork should be converted to CMYK. Check your file for any spot (PMS) colors that you are not using and delete them. Click on Glossary Tab Above

Creating PDF files — Fonts should be embedded. Make sure bleeds are pulled. Understand that adjustments and changes would need to be made to your original file.

Naming files — When naming your images or files, it is best to use unique, descriptive names to help identify your files quickly and easily (i.e., instead of IMG_0564.jpg, name it J_Smith_Nov12.jpg).

Packaging or collecting documents for press — Be sure to place a checkmark in the boxes that gather the links for all images and fonts used in your artwork (see below). It is also a good idea to make a PDF of your final artwork and send it with your package, so that we can use it for cross-reference before we provide you with a press proof.

InDesign®
QuarkXPress®

• Stuffing or zipping your files for transmitting via FTP — Create a folder on your computer desktop with the name of your job. Gather all of the items that go with your job and copy them into the folder — the original file you created, the fonts you used, the graphic images you included, and a PDF, if possible, for us to see the formatted file exactly as you see the formatted file. Control click (Mac) or right click (PC) on the folder and select the option that says “Compress” of folder (Mac) or select the zip option (PC). A “.zip” folder will appear on your desktop, ready for transmittal. (See our Upload File page.)

Quick Response (QR) Codes

QR codes for Howard Printing, Inc.Quickly connect your clients to your website via your printed materials with a new technology called QR codes.

Short for "Quick Response," QR codes are a new, easy, and cost-free way to effectively — and literally — connect print with mobile technology.

Similar to the horizontal bar codes familiar to us on store products, QR codes are square, two-dimensional, matrix codes that can be scanned with today's smartphones (e.g., iPhone, Blackberry, Droid).

Clients will see your direct-mail postcard (or brochure, business card, poster, etc.), point their smartphone camera at the QR code, snap the picture, and — voila! — they will be linked instantly and directly to your website for more detailed information.

For instance, include a QR code on your next "save-the-date" postcard for an upcoming event. A postcard has space for only so much information. Provide the basic details along with a QR code for your invitees to scan, linking them to an early registration page on your website.

In addition to linking to a web page, a QR code can also activate a number of smartphone functions, including email, adding contact information to an address book, instant messaging (IM), and short message services (SMS) such as texting.

Originally invented in Japan in 1994, QR codes were created by Denso-Wave to track warehouse parts for vehicle manufacturing. According to Denso-Wave (www.denso-wave.com), the QR code instantly provides approximately 100 times as much information as the traditional bar code.

Since Denso-Wave allowed the technology to be freely shared, the QR code has become a world standard and is rapidly expanding with the proliferation of smartphones.

So exactly how do QR codes work?

To create a QR code, you need four basic items: a URL (e.g., your website domain name), a URL shortener (e.g., bit.ly, tinyurl.com, goo.gl), a QR code generator, and a place to display the QR code (e.g., ad, business card, newsletter, brochure, poster). Plenty of free QR code generator software is available online. (Here is a link to a good place to start.)

Since we here at Howard Printing are familiar with generating QR codes and sizing them appropriately to be read by scanners, we are happy to generate the QR code for you at no extra charge.

To read a QR code, you need two items: a smartphone with a built-in camera and a reader application ("app" for short), which can be downloaded for free. Then you just point your smartphone camera at the QR code, snap the picture, and the app will decode the image and link you directly to a website or a phone number.

There is no one universal reader app that works well with every kind of QR code and every kind of smartphone. No worries, though, because you have a multitude of choices. We have listed several below for your consideration:

BeeTagg (www.beetagg.com)
i-nigma (www.i-nigma.com)
Kaywa (www.kaywa.com)
Neo Reader (www.neoreader.com)
QuickMark (www.quickmark.com.tw)
QR App (block5.com/QRapp.html)
ScanLife (www.scanlife.com)
Semacode (www.semacode.com)
UpCode (www.upc.fi)

By adding a QR code to your printed materials, you can quickly bridge the gap between print and web, connecting your clients or prospective customers immediately to you!

We hope you’ll take advantage of this sophisticated and smart marketing tool.

 
Ink Bar
 
Howard Printing, Inc., of Brattleboro, Vermont, is a full-service commercial printing company providing offset and digital printing,
wide-format printing, graphic design, computer-to-plate prepress technology, variable data printing, mailing services, and
bindery and finishing services. Howard Printing is also the publisher of the New England Showcase real estate magazine
and two Vermont coloring books.
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